Friday, November 21, 2014

Oh, What a Week It's Been

When the Lumpkins first moved in, the very tip of Wilma's tail had hair loss. Monica, who fostered the kittens for the first ten days, said they thought it might have been injured, or, perhaps one of her siblings had been nursing on it, which isn't all that uncommon when babies are pulled off mom at a young age. I wouldn't say I was worried about it, but I did keep an eye on it.

On Monday eve, I noticed the hair directly above Frieda's eyes was thinning, which gave me cause for concern, so I emailed the foster department to request an appointment with the doctor.  I brought them in for their appointment Tuesday, and by the then, the thin parts on Frieda were now bald and expanding. 

I left the kittens in vet treatment, and went down to the foster room to wait. Within a few minutes, the vet tech came into the room and said "It's not good, Doc will be here in a moment to talk to you."  

And it wasn't good. 

They have ringworm. Which isn't life-threating, but it's hard on wee kittens, and it's a monster to deal with.  It requires a long quarantine period that can mean anywhere from two to six months of confinement for the kittens during their treatment. It requires being very careful, and keeping things very clean - it's a fungus, and spores can travel. During the quarantine period you treat, test, re-treat and retest until there’s no sign of it. 

At this time, calls were being made, but we didn't have a plan in place for the kittens, so I brought them home and put them back in the basement. I ran to the store to get bleach, gloves, and a few other cleaning supplies. When I returned, I fed them, tucked them into their carrier,  stripped all the linens from the cage, then started a load blankets and towels in the washer. I scrubbed down their cage with bleach water, and wiped down all surrounding surfaces and the floor. Once the cage was dry, I added fresh blankets and returned them to their quarters. 

I wasn’t sure was what going to happen next, but as heart-crushing as it was,  I knew they couldn't remain here with us. I couldn’t risk exposing the girls, and we're not set up here with a space that can comfortably hold them for the length of time they would need to be quarantined. We don't have a room, we have a wire kennel in the corner of a big, open basement. And this kills me, you have no idea how much this kills me, but we had to find them a place outside of our home where they could be treated and recover.  Thankfully, there is a foster mom who has taken such kittens before, and currently has a pair she is treating, so she agreed to take in our Lumpkins.  I’m so, so very grateful she’s willing to do this. I know it’s not an easy task and it requires much work and huge dedication.  

Yesterday afternoon I packed up the Lumpkins and took back them to the shelter. Their new mom will be picking them up today.  

You put your heart at risk when fostering. I know this, and I’ve prepared for this.  Mine is strong enough to weather the usual goodbyes and gold medal ceremonies, but having to hand over these three wee beauties, before they’re done at our finishing school, is breaking my heart right now.  There have been many tears in the past 48 hours. I've cursed even more than I cried. I know this is what they need, this is what is best, and they'll be fine,  but I feel so horrible that I can't see them through this on my own. 


There is still much cleaning to do, and do again. Though the kittens were contained and we were careful, these spores could have wafted anywhere in our house, and we need to be thorough and be rid of this before we bring in any vulnerable kittens again. I'm not sure how long this will take.

 Ringworm is contagious, but the big cats haven't done any mingling with the kittens because the little ones were still in the quarantine stage. No common surfaces were shared, and we're always VERY careful about washing hands after handling kittens, so I'm not worried about Charlene and Wylla.  As for us humans, we can get it too, but we buy hand-sanitizer by the gallon and wash hands religiously. And if we happen to catch it, it's easily treated.

I’ve offered to provide help, or whatever the new foster mom might need for the babies while they’re in her care, and when they are fully treated and ready for adoption, I will help find them homes.  Any updates she shares, I will share with you, but I have no to plans to pressure her for any reports or photos.  Her hands are going to be really full, and I can’t ask any more of her.

 I'm sorry to have to share this news with you, you know how I hate to share sad things here, but of course I had to tell this story.  This week has been intense, but a plan is now now in place.  There are still bright futures ahead for these kittens, it's just going to take a little time and extra work to get them there.

I did take a couple of pictures of the Lumpkins before they left, but honestly, they’re hard to look at. The kittens don’t look good, and I would prefer that these aren’t the images that linger with us. So instead, here they are, ten days ago when they first moved in.

Please think good thoughts for the wee ones, and hope for their sake and their new caregiver's too, their recovery is quick.  

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64 comments:

  1. Im so sorry Laurie! Must be so hard to let those kitties go, even when you know its for the best... Hugs and happy thoughts to their recovery!

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  2. Sending you HUGE hugs, Laurie! While it's hard to hear this, we ALL need to know that loving kittens (and everything else) is WAY more than adorable pictures and fairy dust.
    XO

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  3. Thank you so much for sharing this. I believe that people (and kittens!) come into our lives for a reason, and the Lumpkins have definitely reminded me of the hard work that fostering can be and why the donating and fundraising is so important. It's not all playing with kittens, and you've been able to gently guide us through all the ups and downs through this blog. Thank you so much, and best wishes for a speedy Lumpkin recovery.

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  4. Very sorry to hear about this but so glad that your fellow fosterer can handle these babies. I know from experience how tough and fear-inducing ringworm is. Both my lovely cats got it from a great kitten I adopted. He was a carrier and never got it, but he was subjected to the horrid baths, like my two, who also required oral meds. We found the kitten another great home (I still miss him like mad) and my two were eventually, expensively cured. All good thoughts to you and the wonderful person who has taken these sweet things on. They will indeed get through it.

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  5. I'm so sorry, I know your heart is broken. But it sounds like the Lumpkins are in the best possible hands to ensure their full recovery.

    Don't ever feel bad about having to share sad news here. This community will always be behind you in good times and bad.

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  6. So sorry to hear this! I hope that the cleaning goes well, and hugs to all of you. My fingers are crossed that the Lumpkins recover quickly.

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  7. we have dealt with it and it can be a pain in the behind. glad they are safe and being treated....as much as it pains you to have them elsewhere, they are getting the care they need.

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  8. Lynn, India and ZoubiNovember 21, 2014 at 9:43 AM

    Gosh Laurie- I know if this makes me sad, it must make you even sadder. I keep reminding myself that these little ones are in great hands, they will go to good homes, and that you will get new kittens when you can. I'm going to focus on the positives- thank goodness there is someone to treat them, thank goodness they are well other than the ringworm, thank goodness you saw it, thank goodness they had some wonderful time at your house, and thank goodness they will get well in time. I hope we get to see a picture of them when they are all well and going to their new homes and that they will be seen as IBKC kitties forever.

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  9. I know you feel awful, Laurie, but just think of this as one thing in a long, long line of wonderful things you do for the kittens -- which includes knowing when giving them up, or in the case of little Jerry Lee, letting go, is the best thing for all. Charlene, Wylla, and the house humans' health is important, too!

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  10. The good news is that the condition is not life-threatening. It is sad. It will be a lot of work for you and the new foster mom. But the kitties will be fine and will go on to live happy healthy lives. Thanks for shepherding them through the last couple of weeks and on to their next home. liz a

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  11. So sorry to hear this. This sounds both awful but have hopes for the kittens will be fine one day.

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  12. How heartbreaking! But you and the other foster mom are doing the right thing, that which is best for the kittens. They're lucky to have had their time with you, and even luckier that you caught the ringworm early enough that they can be successfully treated. Hugs to you!!

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  13. I agree with everyone else here, that you did what is best for the babies. And it isn't a death sentence for them, just a little bump in the road. And I am confident that they will grow up and have wonderful lives, albeit, not nearly as refined as they would have been in Charlene's Kitten Finishing School! :-)

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  14. Although the turn of these events is quite shocking for the wee ones I believe there is a higher purpose working here. All the positive forces in the universe are working for the Lumpkins:
    you were meant to foster them, even for such a short while; you knew something was wrong with Frida and you did the right thing by taking them to the vet; you found them a warm and loving home to get them through this serious medical episode; and when this is all over you will find them their forever homes. Prayers will be lifted to Bast for their recovery and a candle lighted every evening in their honor.
    Peace and Love to you, Craig, Charlene and Wyla.

    Judith (and Finn, Levi, Henry, Dylan and Albert)

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  15. Dear Laurie, it's going to be okay. You've, as always, made the most responsible decisions for you, your family, and the dear little kittens. I know it was heartbreaking, but you did the right thing. They'll get the care they need, and you'll be able to get your household to rights and be ready for the next bunch of fosters.

    My little Jonah, the orange boy, came to us a little kitten, all sneezing and sniffling - but unbeknownst to us - also with ringworm - he had a spot on his shoulder. I and older sister Daltrey cat contracted it from him - Daltrey, a spot on her neck, and me, a spot on my knee. So all three of us had to put apply ointment, and I was cleaning and disinfecting the entire house! It took a while, but we got through it fine, and Jonah is a happy little guy, and Daltrey is just as prissy as ever.

    The funny thing - my significant other never, ever got it, and he had snuggled all three of us! Just lucky, I guess. :-)

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  16. Awww, poor kit-kats. Hope they feel better soon. I'm with the others on the positive notes: you caught it early, it's treatable, and you found just the right person to treat it for them.

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  17. Oh, I am sorry. but relieved that someone who is set up for it can take the babies. perhaps when they are better & ready for adoption you can get some photos or perhaps take some? that would be nice. at any rate, big hugs. xoxo

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  18. Given the sheer number of fosters you have had, I am amazed this has not happened before. It sucks big time for you, Craig, Beanie, Wylla and your many fans. But kittens being healthy come first. You saw it early and took the right steps. Still sucks.

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  19. Laurie, hun, you always do the best possible thing for the kittens you foster and once again you have done the right thing. Hang in there, we are all with you. The kitties will be looked after and thank goodness they came to such a good, caring and attentive home as yours even if it was just for a few days. Big hugs, Jo x

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  20. I'm so glad the kittens have a home to stay in during their treatment. At the shelter where I volunteer, a lot of cats, some kittens but also adults, live in the hospital for the months of treatment and it can be really hard one them. Luckily, they still get lots of loving care and find their forever homes. The Lumpkins are just doubly blessed to find a foster home that can take care of them. I know it must have been a hard decision but ultimately I think you did what was best for the kittens and for the big girls (including you!). Thank you for all you do!

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  21. Poor babies, God bless them on their journey ahead...and bless their new foster mama too. Laurie, thanks for giving them a good and loving home and start in life.....Go Lumpkins, fight this ringworm hard, my prayers are with you.

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  22. Oh Laurie, you have such a good heart. Those wee babes are so much better for their time with you. Big hug.

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  23. You made their lives glorious for those brief few days. It's going to be okay. They sound like they're in capable hands. This is a reminder to us followers the reason to quarantine new kittens and cats even if they check out negative on most tests. Thank you for all you have done and will do.

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  24. Oh geez, I'm sorry you're having to deal with this. My previous pair of kitties (RIP my boys) had it when I got them as babies. It was a lot of work and I even ended up with it.

    I hope Bean and Wylla remain ringworm free!

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  25. Best of luck, precious ones. xxx (Curator)

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  26. freckledme, Princess Buttercup, Elphaba, (Max and Pooh too!!!)November 21, 2014 at 10:46 AM

    You, and Craig, and Bean and Wylla are my heroes!!! You inspire me every day with how much work you put into all these little ones. You bring so much LOVE and joy into all of our (and their) lives, and I'm just so happy this wasn't another Jerry Lee story that I can't be sad for the Lumpkins!!
    They're so blessed to be in your care for even a little time, and to know there is an entire Butterbean Quarantine for other cats who aren't quite as lucky as them just amazes me and makes me want to grow up and be like you Laurie.

    I think it's important for all of us to know that even though we see all the sweet and crazy times, there is SO MUCH work and time that you dedicate to the HS and kittehs, otherwise we might all decide to jump in as well, and not be able to provide the right environment. Jerry Lee, and Wylla made me truly rethink my own ability to start fostering, so for now I volunteer at a rescue.

    I really think Wilma knew something was up, and was trying to escape as a way of telling you it was time to go. ;)

    Hugs and chin skritches to one and all.

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    1. Soooo very well said and every sentiment echoed by me as well. I couldn't add a word more but will send you hugs Laurie and virtual hugs to the bitty Lumpkins!!

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  27. Laurie, remember that a good immune system helps in treating ringworm -- and I am beyond certain that your wonderful care of these kittens in the past few weeks has made them super healthy to fly through this obstacle. (Pat C.)

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  28. *HUGS* To Laurie, your husband, and the rest of the IBKC staff. You did the right thing. When I realized Josie needed a new home I was devastated, but she's SOOO much happier now. The Lumpkins were lucky to have you care for them and do what is in their best interest. We were lucky to have known them. They're in good hands and when the ringworm is eliminated, they'll find wonderful homes. Thank you for all you've done for them.

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  29. So so sorry to hear this. Hugs and prayers little bitties.

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  30. How heartbreaking this must be for you. I'm glad you have a plan in place, and they will be in good hands now.

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  31. Awww ... I'm so sorry! <3 Thanks for all you do!

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  32. Oh my what a heartbreaking story. I hope the kittens will be able to overcome this. Lots of purrs to them.

    Emma nad Buster

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  33. Now, that made me cry. Not for the kittens, who will be fine, but for how hard this is on our beloved Laurie! ::::sigh::::: I hope God and the Universe blesses her with peace now. Good luck, Lumpkins! I had ringworm as a child -- I'm sure you'll be fine and joking about it when you're all grown up (like, "there's a fungus among us...")

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  34. I am so sorry to hear this, but also feel so grateful that there are people in this world who take such wonderful care of these little ones!

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  35. So very sorry to hear about this Laurie. Chiming in with one more thank you for the hard work, and the tears that go along with it at times.

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  36. Much love to you, Laurie! Definitely sounds like you made the right choice for everyone involved.

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  37. Haaaaa, ringworm - went through it this summer with fosters. It took MONTHS to get rid of. I'm convinced that it doesn't even matter which treatment you use (trust me, I tried them ALL) - the kittens just need to work it out of their systems. And none of my perma-cats got it, even though they had repeated exposure to the kittens. (I, however, was not so lucky.)

    of course, the "ick" factor was significantly diminished once I learned that it's not a "worm" at all, but a fungus - like athlete's foot. The more you know ...

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  38. The Lumpkins will always be IBKC kitties! Bless you for caring for them, and putting them in the best possible position to recover from this.

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  39. Dear Laurie, I wish you balm for your aching heart and crushed spirit. I think those two scarf-wearing furballs of yours are just the ones to provide the comfort in these disappointed days. I am so, so sorry that you and the kittens have to go through this. Many blessings and thanks to both you and the new foster mom. You both were there at precisely the right moment when the Lumpkins needed you. Sending you love....

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  40. I'm so sorry you're going to have to do all this extra work to clean and clean and clean again, but you have done so much good taking care of these babies, I know they have benefited from their short time with you! I only wish I were in the area so I could volunteer to come over and help you clean. I know the Lumpkins will be fine and will be happy, healthy kitties in a few months, ready for adoption. I'm also really glad that there's another foster mom willing to take on this added challenge. I know the babies will benefit from her love and care, too!

    I remember when you realized you wouldn't be able to foster for a year because of that other disease with the extra-long name -- but as it turned out, that was a wonderful year for the IBKC community as we all got to watch Wylla grow up to be a strong and much, much healthier girl, proof that a kitten in your hands is getting the very best care possible. You can pass on the Lumpkins to their new foster mom with a clear heart, knowing you've done absolutely everything you could for them. And we'll still be here whenever you're able to foster again -- unfortunately, there are always more babies needing a good foster home, aren't there? In the meantime, I know Wylla and Charlene will enjoy the quality time with you!

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  41. Aw, sweet baby Lumpkins... You did the right thing, and we're sending good, healthy and happy thoughts to you, the girls, and of course, the baby kittens!

    Snuggles from Atticus, Mae and Malcolm

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  42. Much sympathy. My boys went through ringworm just after I adopted them. It was *not* fun. On the bright side, we made it through, and I have two healthy, rambunctious, affectionate two-year-old cats sharing my home, so it was worth it. Here's hoping for exactly the same results for the Lumpkins.

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  43. Oh, dear. *winces* These things do happen when you're a foster parent for furbabies. I'm glad there's a foster mom who's able to take the Lumpkins, so they won't be in the shelter during treatment. I hope the humans, Bean, and Miss Wylla escape the tenacious scourge that is ringworm.

    I'm glad it's only ringworm that's put your fostering on hold, and not something nastier, like FIP. Ringworm's a real pain in the butt, but it's treatable and not a killer. For that, I'm glad. The Lumpkins will make it through, and when they have all their fur again, they'll go to fabulous furever homes and have great lives ruling over their human slaves. And they will deserve those great lives after enduring months of ringworm treatment, yes, they will. ;)

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  44. Laurie, I am so sorry to hear the Lumpkins have ringworm. I just read some information about ringworm on http://www.tinykittens.com/ringworm no doubt the expense for the treatment and disinfection is high. Is the cost to treat and disinfect reimbursed/paid for by the Humane Society for Tacoma and Pierce County for you, Monica and the new foster mom? If not, would you consider setting up a funding site for those wishing to contribute toward these expenses? I presume Monica, the first foster mom will need to decontaminate her home also as you are doing, plus the third foster mom has a continual ongoing process to keep her clean room clean plus the treatment.

    Thanks for letting us know if we can help. My hat is off to you, Craig, and everyone who works, fosters and volunteers to help the itty bitties.

    Many hugs to you all.

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    1. Yes, Lori, that is a wonderful idea! I was thinking the same thoughts. Laurie, how is that done? I would love to send a donation to help defray your costs!

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  45. I'm so sorry! Hope u get better soon Lumpkins!!

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  46. Good grief, Laurie! If y'all did not keep such a diligent eye on the sweet itty bitties as they go thru their quarantine they might have gone much more bald or scruffy.
    HS has such an incredible foster volunteer network that I am satisfied with their transfer to someone who is set up to deal with this challenge.

    I will try to remember to send the Lumpkins wishes for good health and to include their new companion kittens as well. And many thanks to the new fosterer for having the wherewithal to work through the challenge.

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  47. Hugs, Laurie! The cats and kittens are so lucky to have a great team making the best choices for all of them.

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  48. We deal with ringworm 2-3 times a year at my group. However, with no mingling of linens, bowls, food, etc. rarely does it spread. And the good news, the healthier and happier the cats are, the quicker they heal up. And the happier and healthier other cats are, like your 2 pets, the less likely they are to catch it. your vet probably has told you this already, just wanted you to hear it from someone in the trenches like you are. Gail

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  49. Beams for them, and you.

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  50. We recently adopted four kittens (long story), and, a few weeks in, all four started showing signs of ringworm. Our vet said that some years are worse for ringworm than others, and this year is a bad one, especially among rescue kittens. The hardest part is that our beloved kitties are utterly bewildered--I used to let them climb all over me, but I really can't do that safely anymore, and they seem a bit hurt. At the same time, I sort of regret having ever let them get quite so close, since I now have my very own case of ringworm... My glands are all swollen, and I am just hoping really hard that no creepy fungus patches appear on my face before an upcoming job interview. So... it's difficult, but it seems like you made the only choice you could, especially with Charlene and Wylla to consider. If you can, try to remember that you've already helped the Lumpkins hugely by giving them a cozy place to stay and creating a social foundation that will continue to serve them well as they grow up. xx

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  51. What troopers you foster parents are- you to deal with all the extra bleaching and cleaning, and new-mom to take on the longer term care of balding kittens.
    This is just a bump in the road, a temporary fungal funk for these kittens. They will get better.
    I don't know if any of the animal lovers here follow horse sports, but the legendary racehorse Zenyatta had ringworm as a filly and most buyers didn't want her- she got treatment and grew up to fame (Horse of the year), fortune (6 million), and good health.

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  52. My thoughts are with you and the kittens. I know they will be fine, and thank goodness you were on the watch and they are getting care promptly! Keep your chin up!

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  53. My heart bleeds for you and the little Lumpkins. I'm glad to know they will eventually be OK, but hadn't realized what a big deal ringworm is for kittens. I will miss not knowing what spunky, monkey Wilma is up to next, getting to watch Charlene instruct Stewart on how to keep his super-floofy tux front up to standards, and just generally getting to know Frieda better. Still one of the things I've always admired about IKC is that it doesn't hide the awful things that can happen. The first time I logged one was the day you found out little Filbert was too sick to live and you were worried that his sisters were infected, too. You didn't try to hide the situation or worry that you would lose readership if you didn't keep us happy and amused at all costs, but shared the facts ...and your feelings... with great candor. That honesty is one of the things that keeps IKC from simply being kitten eye-candy. (Although heaven knows, they are cute!!!)

    It must be hard to give them up at this point, but I'm sure the Lumpkins will recover all the quicker because of the good start you gave them and because of the good care the new foster mom you picked will give them. I hope when they are ready to be adopted, we'll get to see picutures of the splendid cats they've become. Remember how many wee ones you HAVE nursed though various illnesses and how much pleasure you give all of us. When you all decided to adopt Wylla, some of us at the office had a group hug we were so pleased!...I work in a legal department, trust me, group hugs are not part of the usual day's agenda.

    Thinking you and the Lumpkins (though unseen) as they recover.

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  54. Oh Laurie, I am so sorry. It has to be really tough on you but you have given them a great start and the imprint of your love will be with them forever. I hope they all recover soon and that you and Craig don't get ringworm. It's really tough that you have to deal with the cleaning and infection a second time and when you are ready and able, the next class of kittens can enroll in your wonderful finishing school.

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  55. I know ringworm can sound scary and that it is contagious, but I'm worried that after your followers read this post they might refuse to foster cases like this without a second thought...I just finish fostering a litter of three kittens with the mom, and they all had ringworm. The animal control facility lied about this when they released them to our rescue, so I didn't know when I committed to taking them, but never once did I think about backing out, and the rescue never recommended that I should. (We have three dogs and one cat of our own.) They stayed in quarantine, linens and all supplies kept separately and washed/bleached often, and there was no spreading, to the humans or other animals in our household.

    It was definitely one of the most complicated crews I've cared for, but as ringworm is not fatal and one of the diseases that healthy pets with strong immune systems (i.e., our own kiddos) aren't *as* susceptible to, I'm so glad I took them in as I don't know if anyone else would have stepped up. I'm glad someone was able to do that in your case.

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  56. So sorry! We have had ringworm in our house for many years and I'm pretty much the only one who gets it every spring through fall. I have naftin from my dermatologist and while it's a nuisance it's not a big deal. When we first got it they made it sound like we'd have to burn the house down and salt the earth. LOL! Hopefully you can get things cleaned up and have no further issues.

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  57. So sorry to hear the news. I was looking forward to their adventures. I do foster work and have a few that have come in with the "ringworm". The best thing that worked on them was coconut oil. Odd but true.

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  58. I would suggest buying a small handheld black light. Ringworm glows under it, as does cat urine.
    We adopted two foster kittens with ringworm and they passed it onto my oldest daughter's head. The black light helped us see exactly where we needed to apply the medicine on her scalp and it enabled us to check for other patches.

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  59. Thank you and your friend at the shelter for all you do for these little wee ones - I, and all of us, know that you are very dedicated and that you will always do your very best for the kitties. Cross my fingers, and Pipa crosses her paws too.

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  60. My eyes teared up reading your post- I'm so sorry you have gone through this! I can only echo what others have said: you've taken all the right steps, have the hugest heart and you have the support of this community to help you through. We will miss their wee faces but they are now with an expert and that is the right place for them.

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  61. Aww, how hard this has been for you. I know you went through a long quarantine with Wylla, and now this! You have done the best you could do for the kittens, and hopefully their new foster mom will bring them through this.

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  62. Of course everybody would love the cuteness the Lumpkins would bring to this blog if they remained with you, but I want Wylla and Charlene to stay healthy! Hopefully time will fly, the Lumpkin family will be treated for ringworm, and more fantastic foster kittens will arrive in your care!

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