Kitty FAQs

What is the IBKC blog all about?
The IBKC blog follows the daily lives of our foster kittens and our permanent resident cats,  Charlene Butterbean and Wylla Stout. Occasionally we feature other foster kittens and shelter cats on our blog.

The original purpose of the blog was to find homes for our kittens.  That's still our mission, but we're also here to make your day brighter.  And we raise money for homeless cats and kittens - in the past five years, we've raised over $260,000 for our shelter!

There's an amazing community that follows the IBKC that's full of very kind folks.   It's a warm, fuzzy, happy, snark-free place.  Negativity is not tolerated here.


Who are the Itty Bitty Kitties?
The Itty Bitty Kitties are orphaned kittens that come to us from our local Humane Society.  They're usually a few weeks old when they move in, we care for the babes until they are old enough to be adopted, then we find them loving homes.


When did the IBKC start?
We took in our first foster kittens in April of 2007.  The blog began in August of 2007.


Who cares for the kittens?
The kitties are cared for by the human members of the IBKC, Laurie Cinotto and Craig Miller.  The shelter provides their medical care. 

Who writes this blog?
Laurie Cinotto.

How many kittens have you fostered so far?  

We've hosted 168 kittens (40 litters).


Where do your kittens come from ?

We don't live in the Seattle/Tacoma area. Can we adopt one of your kittens?
I'm sorry, but we prefer to keep it local. I'm sure there are lots of lovely kittens at your local shelter.


How do I go about adopting one of these kitties?
First, send us an email and tell us about yourself and the kind of home you could offer a kitten (or two).   When the kittens are around 6 weeks old, we set appointments for a "meet and greet". If all goes well at your meeting, and the kittens approve, you may adopt.

Because they are Humane Society kittens, we must follow their rules. There is an application process and an adoption fee. All kittens must be spayed or neutered before leaving our nest. Because these kittens receive copious amounts of love while they are in our care, we only let them go to people that promise they'll do the same. Seriously, if you're looking for a kitty just because you have a large mouse population in your home, please look elsewhere.

We don't want to adopt,  can we just come visit the kitties?
I'm sorry, but we don't grant requests for visits . We just can't.

Are these kittens the cutest kittens in the world?
Of course they are.

How do you come up with these names?
I keep an on-going list of potential kitten names. I look for names in all sorts of places - on name tags of waitresses, on street signs and billboards, in newspapers, and movie credits. I think about names from my childhood and look in old yearbooks. I also look online. I'll do a search for something like "civil war generals" or "1950's country singers" to see what comes up. I take naming the kittens seriously, and try hard to come up with a name that feels like a good fit for their personality.

Do the kittens keep there names after they're adopted, or do their adopters change them?
Some do, some don't, but I think more do keep them than don't.

How big are these itty bitty kitties?
I know it's hard to get a sense of the size of the kitties from the pictures. Generally, when people meet the IBKs, they are surprised at how small they are.

What kind of camera do you use to take the kitty pics?
I use a Nikon D-40 and a Nikon D-5100.

How many cats does it take to be classified as a "crazy cat lady"?
I think it's thirteen, but it varies from state to state.

How does one go about fostering?
Contact your local animal shelter and request information.   Most shelters have foster programs and are often in need of foster families for kittens and big cats too.  Fostering is very rewarding.  There can be worry, stress and work, but I always feel (and my foster friends will agree) that you get more than you give.

If you don't have the time in your schedule or space in your home to foster, there are many other ways to help. Shelters are always looking for volunteers and donations.

Has Charlene Butterbean ever been a mama?
Nope. She's never been a mother, although mothering comes naturally to her. She loves all kitty babies the second she meets them. She helps keep them groomed and she plays with them too.

Did you foster Charlene?
No, but she was a foster kitten.  Sarah and Kim were her foster moms.

What kind of cat is Charlene Butterbean?
We don't know for sure, but she looks a lot like a Birman. A lot of people think she's a Ragdoll, but she doesn't have the typical Ragdoll temperament.

When is Charlene's Birthday? 
March 15th, 2007

Why is Wylla so wee? 
Wylla has a condition called Mega Esophagus, which has slowed down her growth.  With Mega-E, her esophagus isn't able to push the food into her stomach on its own. She eats standing up so gravity can pull the food into her stomach.  After each meal, she's held upright for 10-15 minutes to continue the process.  

When is Wylla's Birthday? 
January 4th, 2013

Do Charlene and Wylla have a fan club?
No, but you can follow them on Twitter, or be Charlene's Facebook friend, or "like" the IBKC Facebook page, or see lots more pictures on Instagram.

Will you ever adopt one of your foster kittens?
We just did! Hello, Wylla.

Is it hard to say goodbye to the kitties?

Yes, it is. But then we say hello to new kitties and it's all better again.

Do you have any favorites? Just like any parent, I have favorites, but would never, ever, tell anyone who they are.

Should I spay or neuter my pet?
Yes and Yes.

Should I adopt a shelter kitty? 
YES!

I found kittens, what should I do? 
Read THIS.

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